HOW YOUR VOICE WORKS

Overview

  • Four elements of an instrument (voice)
  • Vocal anatomy of the instrument
  • Cycle of Phonation

THE FOUR ELEMENTS OF AN INSTRUMENT

  1. Actuator – Puts an object into motion
  2. Vibrator – Surface that moves at a consistent and intentional speed, which pushes air around into a sound wave
  3. Resonator – A chamber or space that enhances and amplifies the sound wave, making it more audible and identifiable
  4. Articulator – Adjustable or fixed parts that further shape the sound and give it character

THE CYCLE OF PHONATION

The Cycle of Phonation begins when the brain sends the signal to inhale. Try the following mental exercise by filling in the missing labels:

Actuation
Air is released through a controlled relaxation of the inhalation muscles, forcing air (our breath) upwards from the lungs and through the larynx at the top of the trachea.


Vibration

The moving air passes through the larynx where the vocal folds are housed. When the folds are brought together against the air, they vibrate at varying speeds, depending on how tight or relaxed the folds are.


Resonation
The movement of the vocal folds changes the way the air molecules are moved, forming a sound wave (fundamental frequency). This wave is then enhanced and molded into desired tones in the resonating chambers of space, known as the vocal tract. The vocal tract includes the pharynx (throat), oral cavities and nasal cavities.


Articulation
The enhanced frequency is then further refined and can be intentionally disrupted to create identifiable shapes and sounds (vowels and consonants) by adjusting the muscles related to the tongue, jaw and lips.

CONNECT THE VOICE TO OTHER INSTRUMENTS

Name an instrument other than the voice and identify its Actuator, Vibrator, Resonator and Articulator:

INSTRUMENT: _______________________

ACTUATOR: _______________________

VIBRATOR: _______________________

RESONATOR: _______________________

ARTICULATOR: _______________________

What Did You Learn?

  • What are the four elements of an instrument are
  • What the Cycle of Phonation is and how it begins
  • The vocal anatomy that plays a role in the Cycle of Phonation

THE VOCAL GYM FOR HOMESCHOOL

The Vocal Gym for Homeschool is a Fine Arts credit-qualifying course that offers self-paced, interactive learning for homeschooled high school students interested in singing. The course utilizes the highest U.S. State standards for classroom Artistic Processes and Blooms Taxonomies integrated throughout the curriculum.

Based on the only vocal technique awarded with a U.S Patent, The Vocal Gym revolves around the 7 Dimensions of Singing (Flexibility, Breathing, Intonation, Range, Tone, Articulation, and Strength) which starts with creating a personalized vocal profile for each student. This profile is then used to tailor the exercise, lesson, activity, and quiz experiences within the course to the individual student’s strengths and weaknesses.

BENEFITS OF THE VOCAL GYM FOR HOMESCHOOLERS

  • Self-Paced and Interactive Learning
    The Vocal Gym for Homeschoolers offers a self-paced, interactive curriculum that allows students to learn at their own pace and on their own schedule, making it easier for busy homeschooled students to fit vocal training into their schedules.
  • Qualifies for Carnegie Credit
    Using the Carnegie Credit system, this course can provide homeschooled students 1 full Fine Arts or Extracurricular Credit per year, in all 50 U.S. states.
  • Parental Oversight
    With the Parent Portal, parents can monitor their child’s progress and ensure they are on track to meet their goals. This helps take the stress out of lesson planning and provides peace of mind for busy homeschooling parents.
  • Boosts Confidence and Communication Skills
    Studies have shown that activities in the fine arts and singing can help students develop confidence, improve academically, and become better communicators. The Vocal Gym for Homeschoolers provides a comprehensive curriculum that addresses these areas and helps students achieve their goals.

WHAT'S IN THE HOMESCHOOL COURSE

115,000+ vocal exercise combinations

365-day access to diagnose and measure progress

150 Hours of Lessons, Exercises, and Activities

400 MP3s for practice

384 Educational videos

Copy of the Best-Selling 7 Dimensions of Singing book

Access to the only Patented Vocal Technique in history

A Throga-certified Certificate of Completion

THE VOCAL GYM FOR HOMESCHOOL

The Vocal Gym for Homeschool is a Fine Arts credit-qualifying course that offers self-paced, interactive learning for homeschooled high school students interested in singing. The course utilizes the highest U.S. State standards for classroom Artistic Processes and Blooms Taxonomies integrated throughout the curriculum.

References:

Abstract:

Titze (2006) presents the Myoelastic Aerodynamic Theory of Phonation, which provides a scientific foundation for the four elements of an instrument and the cycle of phonation. The theory describes the actuator as the controlled relaxation of inhalation muscles that forces air upwards from the lungs and through the larynx. The vibrator is identified as the vocal folds housed in the larynx that vibrate against the airflow. The resonator is described as the vocal tract, including the pharynx, oral cavities, and nasal cavities, which enhances and molds the sound wave formed by the movement of the vocal folds. Lastly, the articulator is identified as the muscles related to the tongue, jaw, and lips that refine and shape the sound wave into identifiable shapes and sounds through intentional disruptions, such as vowels and consonants.

Abstract:

Lieberman (2010) discusses the motor control aspects of speech production, including the cycle of phonation. The actuation phase is described as the controlled relaxation of inhalation muscles that allows air to be forced upwards from the lungs and through the larynx. The vibration phase is explained as the vocal folds vibrating against the airflow in the larynx, which determines the fundamental frequency of the sound wave. The resonation phase is identified as the vocal tract, including the pharynx, oral cavities, and nasal cavities, where the sound wave is enhanced and molded. The articulation phase is discussed as the intentional disruptions of the enhanced frequency through adjustments of the muscles related to the tongue, jaw, and lips to create identifiable shapes and sounds.

Abstract:

Ishizaka and Flanagan (1972) present a two-mass model of the vocal cords, which provides insights into the vibration and resonation phases of the cycle of phonation. The model describes the vocal cords as the vibrator that generates sound waves when brought together against the airflow. The resonator is identified as the vocal tract, including the pharynx, oral cavities, and nasal cavities, where the sound wave is enhanced and shaped. The authors also discuss the articulation phase, where the refined frequency can be intentionally disrupted to create identifiable shapes and sounds through adjustments of the muscles related to the tongue, jaw, and lips.